Interferon Alfa-2b (Intron® A)

Other Names: Intron® A

About This Drug

Interferon Alfa is used to treat cancer. This drug can be given in the vein (IV), by a shot into your muscle (IM), by an injection under the skin (SQ), or put on the skin (topically).

Possible Side Effects

  • Flu-like symptoms: fever, headache, muscle and joint aches, and fatigue (low energy, feeling weak)
  • Feeling dizzy
  • Hair loss. Hair loss is often temporary, although with certain medicine, hair loss can sometimes be permanent. Hair loss may happen suddenly or gradually. If you lose hair, you may lose it from your head, face, armpits, pubic area, chest, and/or legs. You may also notice your hair getting thin. 
  • Changes in the way food and drinks taste.
  • Nausea and throwing up (vomiting)
  • Decreases appetite (decreased hunger)
  • Loose bowel movements (diarrhea)
  • Rash

Note: Not all possible side effects are included above.

Warnings and Precautions

  • Allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis are rare but may happen in some patients. Signs of allergic reaction to this drug may be swelling of the face, feeling like your tongue or throat are swelling, trouble breathing, rash, itching, fever, chills, feeling dizzy, and/or feeling that your heart is beating in a fast or not normal way. If this happens, do not take another dose of this drug. You should get urgent medical treatment.
  • Bone marrow depression. This is a decrease in the number of white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets. This may raise your risk of infection, make you tired and weak (fatigue), and raise your risk of bleeding.
  • Blurred vision or other changes in eyesight including loss of vision
  • Severe depression and other psychiatric disorders such as mood changes, thoughts of hurting yourself or others, and suicide.
  • Stroke. Symptoms of a stroke such as sudden numbness or weakness of your face, arm, or leg, especially on one side of your body; sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding; sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes; sudden trouble walking, feeling dizzy, loss of balance or coordination; or sudden bad headache with no known cause. If you have any of these symptoms for 2 minutes, call 911.
  • Effects on the nerves are called peripheral neuropathy. You may feel numbness, tingling, or pain in your hands and feet. It may be hard for you to button your clothes, open jars, or walk as usual. The effect on the nerves may get worse with more doses of the drug. These effects get better in some people after the drug is stopped but it does not get better in all people.
  • Dental and periodontal diseases
  • Changes in the tissue of the heart. Some changes may happen that can cause your heart to have less ability to pump blood.
  • Changes in your thyroid function
  • Increase in your triglycerides
  • Inflammation (swelling) of the lungs, which can be life-threatening. You may have a dry cough or trouble breathing.
  • Changes in your liver function, which can cause liver failure and be life-threatening
  • Interferon alfa-2b contains albumin, which is derived from human blood and carries a very rare risk of transmitting infectious diseases
  • Risk of developing an autoimmune disease (disorder that causes inflammation) such as rheumatoid arthritis, Raynaud’s phenomenon and other diseases

How to Take Your Medication

  • Talk to your doctor, nurse and/or pharmacist for proper preparation, dosing and administration if you are self-injecting this medicine.
  • Missed dose: If you miss a dose, contact your physician right away.
  • Handling: Wash your hands after handling your medicine, your caretakers should not handle your medicine with bare hands and should wear latex gloves.
  • Storage: Store this medicine in the refrigerator, between 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C). Do not freeze. Discuss with your nurse or your doctor how to dispose of unused medicine/needles.

Treating Side Effects

  • Manage tiredness by pacing your activities for the day.
  • Be sure to include periods of rest between energy-draining activities.
  • To decrease infection, wash your hands regularly
  • Avoid close contact with people who have a cold, the flu, or other infections.
  • Take your temperature as your doctor or nurse tells you, and whenever you feel like you may have a fever.
  • To help decrease bleeding, use a soft toothbrush. Check with your nurse before using dental floss.
  • Be very careful when using knives or tools.
  • Use an electric shaver instead of a razor.
  • If you are feeling depressed, talk to your nurse or doctor about it.
  • To help with hair loss, wash with a mild shampoo and avoid washing your hair everyday.
  • Avoid rubbing your scalp, pat your hair or scalp dry.
  • Avoid coloring your hair.
  • Limit your use of hair spray, electric curlers, blow dryers, and curling irons.
  • If you are interested in getting a wig, talk to your nurse. You can also call the American Cancer Society at 800-ACS-2345 to find out information about the “Look Good, Feel Better” program close to where you live. It is a free program where women getting chemotherapy can learn about wigs, turbans and scarves as well as makeup techniques and skin and nail care.
  • If you are dizzy, get up slowly after sitting or lying.
  • Drink plenty of fluids (a minimum of eight glasses per day is recommended).
  • If you throw up or have loose bowel movements, you should drink more fluids so that you do not become dehydrated (lack water in the body from losing too much fluid).
  • To help with nausea and vomiting, eat small, frequent meals instead of three large meals a day. Choose foods and drinks that are at room temperature. Ask your nurse or doctor about other helpful tips and medicine that is available to help or stop lessen these symptoms.
  • Sugar-free hard candies and chewing gum can keep your mouth moist.
  • To help prevent periodontal disease, brush your teeth twice a day and have regular dental examination
  • Taking good care of your mouth may help food taste better and improve your appetite
  • If you get a rash do not put anything on it unless your doctor or nurse says you may. Keep the area around the rash clean and dry. Ask your doctor for medicine if your rash bothers you.
  • If you have numbness and tingling in your hands and feet, be careful when cooking, walking, and handling sharp objects and hot liquids.

Food and Drug Interactions

  • There are no known interactions of interferon alfa-2b with food.
  • This drug may interact with other medicines. Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the medicines and dietary supplements (vitamins, minerals, herbs and others) that you are taking at this time. The safety and use of dietary supplements and alternative diets are often not known. Using these might affect your cancer or interfere with your treatment. Until more is known, you should not use dietary supplements or alternative diets without your cancer doctor's help.

When to Call the Doctor

Call your doctor or nurse if you have any of these symptoms and/or any new or unusual symptoms:

  • Fever of 100.5 F (38 C) or higher
  • Chills
  • Blurred vision or other changes in eyesight
  • Feeling that your heart is beating quickly or in a not normal way (palpitations)
  • Feeling dizzy or lightheaded
  • Pain in your chest
  • Cough
  • Wheezing and/or trouble breathing
  • Nausea that stops you from eating or drinking and/or is not relieved by prescribed medicines 
  • Throwing up more than three times a day
  • Unexplained weight gain
  • New rash and/or itching
  • Rash that is not relieved by prescribed medicines
  • Fatigue that interferes with your daily activities 
  • Numbness, tingling, or pain in your hands and feet
  • Lose interest in your daily activities that you used to enjoy and feeling this way every day, and/or you feel hopelessness.
  • Severe mood changes, unusual thoughts, thoughts of hurting yourself and/or others
  • Signs of possible liver problems: dark urine, pale bowel movements, bad stomach pain, feeling very tired and weak, unusual itching, or yellowing of the eyes or skin
  • Signs of allergic reaction: swelling of the face, feeling like your tongue or throat are swelling, trouble breathing, rash, itching, fever, chills, feeling dizzy, and/or feeling that your heart is beating in a fast or not normal way
  • While you are getting this drug, please tell your nurse right away if you have any pain, redness, or swelling at the site of the IV infusion
  • Symptoms of a stroke such as sudden numbness or weakness of your face, arm, or leg, especially on one side of your body; sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding; sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes; sudden trouble walking, feeling dizzy, loss of balance or coordination; or sudden bad headache with no known cause. If you have any of these symptoms for 2 minutes, call 911.
  •  Any change in a pre-existing auto-immune or inflammatory condition
  • If you think you may be pregnant

Reproduction Warnings

  • Pregnancy warning: This drug may have harmful effects on the unborn baby. For this reason, be sure to talk with your doctor if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant while receiving this drug. Let your doctor know right away if you think you may be pregnant (or may have impregnated your partner.)
  • Breastfeeding warning: It is not known if this drug passes into breast milk. For this reason, women should talk to their doctor about the risks and benefits of breastfeeding during treatment
    with this drug because this drug may enter the breast milk and cause harm to a breastfeeding baby.
  • Fertility warning: Human fertility studies have not been done with this drug. Talk with your doctor or nurse if you plan to have children. Ask for information on sperm or egg banking. 

Revised May 2018

This patient information was developed by Via Oncology, LLC © 2018. This information is not intended to be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. You should not rely entirely on this information for your health care needs. Ask your own doctor or health care provider any specific medical questions that you have.

CLIENT acknowledges that the Via Pathways and Via Portal are information management tools only, and that Via Oncology, LLC has not represented the Via Pathways or Via Portal as having the ability to diagnose disease, prescribe treatment, or perform any other tasks that constitute the practice of medicine. The clinical information contained in the Via Pathways and Via Portal are intended as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the knowledge, expertise, skill, and judgment of physicians, pharmacists and other healthcare professionals involved with patient care at CLIENT facilities.