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Romiplostim (Nplate®)

About This Drug

Romiplostim is used to treat immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). It is given as an injection under the skin (subcutaneously).

Possible Side Effects

  • Indigestion
  • Pain in your abdomen
  • Pain in your shoulders, arms and/or legs
  • Muscle and joint pain
  • Feeling dizzy
  • Numbness, tingling or a sensation of pins and needles in your arms, hands, legs or feet
  • Trouble sleeping

Note: Each of the side effects above was reported in 5% or greater of patients treated with romiplostim. Not all possible side effects are included above.

Warnings and Precautions

  • This drug may increase your risk of getting leukemia if you already have a condition called myelodysplastic syndrome.
  • This drug may increase the risk of blood clots and events such as stroke and heart attack. A blood clot in your leg may cause your leg to swell, appear red and warm, and/or cause pain. A blood clot in your lungs may cause trouble breathing, pain when breathing, and/or chest pain.
  • This drug may not work or may stop working. If this happens, your doctor may check your blood for antibodies to this drug.

Note: Some of the side effects above are very rare. If you have concerns and/or questions, please discuss them with your medical team.

Important Information

  • Let your doctor know right away if you think you may be pregnant or may have impregnated your partner during treatment. Report any pregnancy to Amgen’s Pregnancy Surveillance Program at 1-800-772-6436.

Treating Side Effects

  • Keeping your pain under control is important to your well-being. Please tell your doctor or nurse if you are experiencing pain.
  • If you are dizzy, get up slowly after sitting or lying.
  • If you have numbness and tingling in your hands and feet, be careful when cooking, walking, and handling sharp objects and hot liquids.
  • If you are having trouble sleeping, talk to your nurse or doctor on tips to help you sleep better.

Food and Drug Interactions

  • There are no known interactions of romiplostim with food.
  • This drug may interact with other medicines. Tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the prescription and over-the-counter medicines and dietary supplements (vitamins, minerals, herbs and others) that you are taking at this time. Also, check with your doctor or pharmacist before starting any new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, or dietary supplements to make sure that there are no interactions.

When to Call the Doctor

Call your doctor or nurse if you have any of these symptoms and/or any new or unusual symptoms:

  • Your leg or arm is swollen, red, warm and/or painful
  • Wheezing and/or trouble breathing
  • Chest pain or symptoms of a heart attack. Most heart attacks involve pain in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes. The pain may go away and come back. It can feel like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain. Sometimes pain is felt in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw, or stomach. If any of these symptoms last 2 minutes, call 911.
  • Symptoms of a stroke such as sudden numbness or weakness of your face, arm, or leg, mostly on one side of your body; sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding; sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes; sudden trouble walking, feeling dizzy, loss of balance or coordination; or sudden, bad headache with no known cause. If you have any of these symptoms for 2 minutes, call 911.
  • Numbness, tingling, pins and needles, or pain in your arms, hands, legs or feet
  • Feeling dizzy or lightheaded
  • Tiredness that interferes with your daily activities
  • Trouble falling or staying asleep
  • Pain in your abdomen that does not go away
  • Pain that does not go away, or is not relieved by prescribed medicines
  • Easy bleeding or bruising
  • If you think you are pregnant

Reproduction Warnings

  • Pregnancy warning: It is not known if this drug may harm an unborn child. For this reason, be sure to talk with your doctor if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant while getting this drug. Let your doctor know right away if you think you may be pregnant.
  • Breastfeeding warning: It is not known if this drug passes into breast milk. For this reason, women should talk to their doctor about the risks and benefits of breastfeeding during treatment with this drug because this drug may enter the breast milk and cause harm to a breastfeeding baby.
  • Fertility warning: Human fertility studies have not been done with this drug. Talk with your doctor or nurse if you plan to have children.

Revised August 2019

This patient information was developed by Via Oncology, LLC © 2019. This information is not intended to be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. You should not rely entirely on this information for your health care needs. Ask your own doctor or health care provider any specific medical questions that you have.

CLIENT acknowledges that the Via Pathways and Via Portal are information management tools only, and that Via Oncology, LLC has not represented the Via Pathways or Via Portal as having the ability to diagnose disease, prescribe treatment, or perform any other tasks that constitute the practice of medicine. The clinical information contained in the Via Pathways and Via Portal are intended as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the knowledge, expertise, skill, and judgment of physicians, pharmacists and other healthcare professionals involved with patient care at CLIENT facilities.